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The great famine and the Irish diaspora in America

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Published by University of Massachusetts Press in Amherst .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Ireland

Subjects:

  • Famines -- Ireland -- History -- 19th century.,
  • Irish Americans -- History.,
  • Ireland -- Emigration and immigration -- History -- 19th century.,
  • Ireland -- History -- Famine, 1845-1852.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Statementedited by Arthur Gribben ; introduction by Ruth-Ann M. Harris.
ContributionsGribben, Arthur.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDA950.7 .G735 1999
The Physical Object
Paginationx, 268 p. ;
Number of Pages268
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL349198M
ISBN 101558491724, 1558491732
LC Control Number98008432

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Overview Between and , nearly million Irish women, men, and children sailed to America to escape the Great Famine, triggered by successive years of potato blight. The famine and resulting emigration had a profound impact not only on the history of Ireland, but on that of England and North America as : $   Includes bibliographical references and index Women and the great famine / Patricia Lysaght -- A Tory periodical in a time of famine / Wayne Hall -- Alexis Soyer and the Irish famine / Jillian Strang and Joyce Toomre -- The transfer of land and the emergence of the graziers during the famine period / David S. Jones -- The great famine / Gearóid O ́hAllmhuráin -- Grosse Île / Michael Pages: Download or Read Online the great famine and the irish diaspora in america Book in PDF and ePub Format. If the content not Found, try our sister site click here. is a free search engine which allows you to search, preview and download millions of PDF files into your devices. : The Exile Breed: The Pitiless Epic of the Irish Famine Diaspora (The Irish Famine Series, Book 2 of 3 This second novel in Charles Egan's great Irish famine trilogy provides yet another breathtaking sweep of the historical events that led to the mass migrations of the Irish to North America and England, and to the deaths of over /5().

Synopsis Between and , nearly million Irish women, men and children sailed to America to escape the Great Famine, triggered by successive years of potato blight. The famine and resulting emigation had a profound impact not only on the history of Ireland, but on that of England and Format: Gebundenes Buch. The Great Famine and the Irish Diaspora in America. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, A collection of twelve essays commemorating the th anniversary of the famine that considers life in Ireland, historical perceptions of the events, and the creation of the Irish American identity. The Irish in North America In over 40 million people in the United States and millions more in Canada claimed Irish ancestry. The Irish diaspora in North America was ten or more times as large as the population of Ireland itself and several times larger than the Irish diasporas in Europe, Africa, Australia, or any other continent.   In , the Irish community in New York City had demonstrated that it was in America to stay. Led by a politically powerful immigrant, Archbishop John Hughes, the Irish began building the largest church in New York called it St. Patrick's Cathedral, and it would replace a modest cathedral, also named for Ireland's patron saint, in lower Manhattan.

The Great Famine and the way we remember it as the recent publication of the excellent Atlas of the Great Irish Famine both in Ireland and among the diaspora. A large portion of the book Author: Christine Kinealy. The Great Famine, an Gorta Mór in Irish, was a period of mass starvation, disease and emigration in Ireland between and Often referred to as the Irish Potato Famine, particularly outside Ireland, as around forty percent of the population were reliant on this crop. The Great Famine of Ireland during the s saw a significant number of people flee from the island to all over the world. Between and as a result of death and mass emigration (mainly to Great Britain and North America) Ireland's population fell by over 2 million. In Connacht alone the population fell by almost 30%. Author and distinguished professor Mary Kelly’s book is the first synthesized volume to track Ireland’s Great Famine within America’s immigrant history, and to consider the impact of the Famine on Irish ethnic identity between the mids and the end of the twentieth century.